Sunday, April 5, 2015

AK47 Triangle Stock Paracord Wrap

Plenty of guys out there who do amazing work with 550 cord/paracord; from slings, to belts, even dog collars, and everything else in between. I am not one of them, but I get by here and there when I want to accomplish something. In this case I just wanted to add some comfort to my triangle stock. 

First & foremost, clear your firearm before beginning any work. 

[Click on images to enlarge]


I started with 15 feet of paracord for my wrap, but use 20 feet to be on the safe side. It's better to have excess than to get to the end of your wrap and discover you're short. You will need a lighter/matches, a pair of pliers (optional), some tape (optional), and a knife/scissors. 


Start by lining up the paracord along the object you intend to wrap. The shorter end pictured above and in full view being the "free end" (bottom) while the excess paracord running off the side of the picture will be referred to as the "long, wrap end" (top) and the loop at the opposite end is the "loop end". Three parts: the free end, the wrap end and the loop end. Scroll down to the last image in this blog post and look at the cheat sheet diagram for a quick visual overview of the parts. 

For this demo, the wrap end will be above the free end, as pictured. You can also reverse the direction, opposite of what I have pictured, that's up to you. 


Though not necessary, taping the end loop will hold it in position while you do the wrap.


Take the longer wrap end and send it over the free end, wrapping it under and over the stock.


Bring the wrap end back under itself and loop it through as pictured above. You're basically creating a knot.


Pull it through and then back, behind the stock and now start your wrap.


Tighten each loop into place, evenly and firmly. No need to rush through it, take your time at this point.



Once you get to the end loop you'll send the wrap end through the loop. I got it really close, as pictured above, with just enough to sneak the wrap end through the small opening of the loop end.



With the wrap end through the loop end, pull the free end down and away from the wrap, which in turn pulls the loop end down and into the wrap. Using pliers makes this a lot easier to accomplish and gives you the leverage + grip you need. I only pull the loop end down about 4-5 lines, shifting them into place to accommodate the loop end. 


If you count 5 lines in from end, the loop end is tucked under there. Not flawless, but clean enough.


With the loop end in place under the wrap, take the excess long, wrap end and tie it off. Then cut away the extra paracord. 


Now melt it into place with your fire stick. 


Melted end. Hit it with a black Sharpie if you want to hide the white center. 


Once the loop end has been finished up, cut away the free end, and light it up to melt it into place.






It turned out well and is a lot more comfortable, which is especially noticeable on a cold morning or a hot summers day.



Pictured above is a paracord wrap on an ACE skeleton stock. Pictured on this LINK to ar15.com is another way to do the ACE or FAL stock, 5th post down. A lot of guys also wrap their UFs and their wirestocks or AMD crutch stocks as shown in this LINK.


Above is a cheat sheet diagram based off of a tutorial done by ar15.com member CXS, which is also shown in the links I posted above under the ACE stock wrap. 

Final notes. 550 paracord is readily available online or at your local milsurp store. It is available in many colors, allowing for unlimited options and wrap arrangements. Paracord is exceptionally durable and is a great multipurpose piece of gear to have in your kit. This versatile cord was even used by astronauts during the 82nd Space Shuttle mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope.  - Wikipedia

If anyone has any suggestions on how to finish up the ends more efficiently, post in the comments section. If you have a link to another way to wrap a stock, please also post in the comments section. I'm always interested in trying something new or an alternate method.

No comments:

Post a Comment